Head and Spinal Injuries Florida

Sharpe P.A. has successfully litigated hundreds of cases involving head and/or spinal injuries.

Our experience with spinal injuries range all the way from quadriplegia to simple disc herniations.

A spinal injury or head injury may result from a motor vehicle accident, a slip and fall, an object crashing down upon a person, a bicycling or pedestrian accident, boating accidents, diving accident, etc.

No matter how the injury occurred, it can make a devastating impact on a person’s life.

In most cases, an injury to the spinal cord may also result in severe head pain. These occipital discogenic headache patterns are usually linked to a spinal injury. Also present, may be severe pain that radiates into the upper and/ or lower extremities, linked with injuries to the spine.

For a person without a medical background, it can be intimidating to hear medical terms associated with an unfamiliar injury. In order to help our clients better understand their spinal injuries, please see below a glossary of medical terms commonly associated with spinal anatomy. This list is by no way complete or intended to substitute competent medical advice and treatment.

SPINAL ANATOMY - Glossary of Terms
Annulus fibrosis – tough fibrous ring around the disc.
Anterior – From the front of the body.
Anterior Column – The front 3/4 of the vertebral body and disc. The column classification is used to determine the stability of the spine.
Autogenous Bone – bone originating from the same individual; i.e., a patient’s own bone.
Autograft Bone – bone transplanted from one part to another part of the body in the same individual.
Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) – naturally occurring chemicals in the body- that play a major role in bone growth. BMP-like products are proteins that enhance mineralization and which can increase bone formation during fusion operation.
Bone spurs – also called osteophytes (please see below)
Bulge of the disc: the form or position of the disc changes with some slight impingement into the spinal canal. Also called a prolapse or protrusion.
Cervical – Referring to the neck, the top seven vertebrae of the spine.
Corpectomy – Removal of the vertebral body, usually to remove pressure off of the spinal nerves.
Degeneration of the disc: chemical changes associated with aging causes discs to weaken, but without a herniation. These changes can be seen on MRI scans, and are usually asymptomatic.
Diagnostic tests – include MRI, X-ray, CT scan, bone scan, discogram, myelogram.
Disc (also spelled Disk) – the structure between the vertebral bodies.
Discectomy – removal of the disc.
Extrusion of the disc: the gel-like nucleus pulposus breaks through the tire-like wall (annulus fibrosus) but remains within the disc.
Foraminotomy – opening of the foramen where the nerve exits.
Kyphosis – roundback (when viewed from the side). The thoracic spine is normally kyphotic.
Laminectomy – removal of the lamina.
Laminotomy – partial removal of the lamina.
Lordosis – swayback (when viewed from the side). The cervical and lumbar spines are normally lordotic.
Middle Column – the posterior portion of the vertebral body and disc (as defined by a study by Denis). The column classification is used to determine the stability of the spine.
Myelopathy – spinal cord dysfunction usually caused by compression. Signs include hyperreflexia (heightened reflexes), balance difficulties, dropping items and lack of coordination, and bowel and bladder dysfunction.
Natural History – what the patient’s outcome would be in given disease or condition without intervention (naturally).
Nucleus Pulposus – the soft inner core of the disc.
Neuroforamina – the tunnels where the nerve exists from the spinal canal to the arms and legs.
Osteophyte – bone spur.
Pars Interarticularis – a posterior bony structure between two adjacent facet joints in the lumbar spine. This structure is stressed and may fracture with extension and rotation of the lumbar spine.
Postlaminectomy spondylolisthesis – a slipped vertebral body which occurs post-operatively, if the remaining bones are not strong enough to support the spine.
Posterior – from the back of the body.
Posterior Column – the facet joint, lamina, pars, spinous process, and adjoining ligaments. The column classification is used to determine the stability of the spine.
Posterior Longitudinal Ligament – ligament between the vertebral body and discs in front, and the spinal cord or nerve sac in back.
Prolapse of the disc: the form or position of the disc changes with some slight impingement into the spinal canal. Also called a bulge or protrusion.
Protrusion of the disc: the form or position of the disc changes with some slight impingement into the spinal canal. Also called a prolapse or bulge.
Pseudoarthrosis – lack or failure of fusion.
Radiculopathy – arm or leg pain being caused by nerve impingement or irritation.
Radicular – pain radiating down the arms or legs.
Scoliosis – curvature of the spine when viewed from the front or back. The curvature is usually associated with rotation of the vertebral bodies.
Sequestration or Sequestered Disc: the nucleus pulposus breaks through the annulus fibrosus and lies outside the disc in the spinal canal (HNP).
Stenosis – tightness and compression of the spinal cord, nerve roots, or dural sac.
Strut graft – A long piece of bone or cage that is inserted into the space created by corpectomy to support (struts) the anterior column of the spine.
Spondylolisthesis – the slipping of one vertebra onto another.
Spondylolysis – a defect in the pars interarticularis.

Latest News

Florida Sovereign Immunity Caps on Damages Increase

Effective october 1, 2011, the sovereign immunity limits in florida have been raised to $200,000.00 per person / $300,000.00 per incident.   more >>

Wrongful Death Action - Intersection collision

The question posed to the Supreme Court of Florida is as follows; DOES THE FORESEEABLE ZONE OF RISK ANALYSIS ESTABLISHED IN MCCAIN V. FLORIDA POWER CORP APPLY TO PRIVATE OWNERS OF RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY CONTAINING FOLIAGE THAT DOES NOT EXTEND INTO THE PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY...   more >>


Ask an attorney…

Have an experienced attorney address your legal needs

captcha    
Security Code:
Call us toll free 866-572-4LAW


Read About
Our Firm Promises
to our clients

In Memoriam
Jordan Camino Evert McCracken